What are you looking for?

FREE EU SHIPPING & FREE 30 DAY RETURNS - NEVER ON SALE

Free Express Shipping & 30 Day Returns
Never on Sale

WHERE ARE YOU SHIPPING TO?

This website ships from Italy to the EU only. If you want to ship outside of the EU, please select WORLDWIDE & UK.

Lifestyle Journal

Alpine Adventures:
Where to go & what to pack

Luca Faloni Italian clothing Quality Knitwear

Daredevil powder hound, 1950s

To some, it might seem like an act of madness to strap two skinny planks to your feet and throw yourself down the side of a mountain, but for those who eagerly await the first snowfall of winter, this is a perennial past time. With skiing and snow sports more popular than ever, there are a host of destinations – both established and up-and-coming – which offer traditional and alternative experiences to satisfy even the most seasoned powder hound.

Here’s our pick of this season’s coolest alpine destinations to tick off your winter sports bucket list – oh, and we’ve rather helpfully included a few suggestions of what to pack.


Italy

Luca Faloni Italian clothing Quality Knitwear

1930s ski poster, advertising the resort of Cortina d’Ampezzo

Italy

Italy has always been associated with glamour and Cortina d’Ampezzo takes the crown as Italy’s most chic resort. Originally rising to prominence after hosting the 1956 winter Olympics, it’s renowned for superb racing trails and chocolate-box charm, which being a traditional Tyrolian village, it has in spades.

For a warming libation after a hard day on the slopes, head to the historic American Bar in the Hotel de la Poste. Formerly a post office for the village’s stagecoach mail, it was transformed into a bar in the early 20th century and in the interwar years, became a favourite haunt of the notoriously vinous writer, Ernest Hemingway. It’s antique pinewood interiors, expertly mixed concoctions and white-jacketed waiters ensure a 5-star alpine experience.

And Cortina isn’t just about skiing and après, either. The town itself has an array of designer shops to satisfy even the most ardent shopper. In fact, a lot of people don’t come here to ski at all – around 70% of visitors never even step onto the piste. For those with a bit more of an intrepid streak, there’s much more on offer than the usual black and blue runs. Snow Ice, offers ice-driving lessons, 3km away in Fiames, where the avid petrol head can experience the thrill of skidding about on fresh ice in a souped-up Mitsubishi (you are of course, trained how to do this, by a professional rally driver). The biggest bonus of staying in Cortina d’Ampezzo of course, is that you can fill up on pasta until your heart’s content.

For a warming libation after a hard day on the slopes, head to the historic American Bar in the Hotel de la Poste. Formerly a post office for the village’s stagecoach mail, it was transformed into a bar in the early 20th century and in the interwar years, became a favourite haunt of the notoriously vinous writer, Ernest Hemingway. It’s antique pinewood interiors, expertly mixed concoctions and white-jacketed waiters ensure a 5-star alpine experience.

And Cortina isn’t just about skiing and après, either. The town itself has an array of designer shops to satisfy even the most ardent shopper. In fact, a lot of people don’t come here to ski at all – around 70% of visitors never even step onto the piste. For those with a bit more of an intrepid streak, there’s much more on offer than the usual black and blue runs. Snow Ice, offers ice-driving lessons, 3km away in Fiames, where the avid petrol head can experience the thrill of skidding about on fresh ice in a souped-up Mitsubishi (you are of course, trained how to do this, by a professional rally driver). The biggest bonus of staying in Cortina d’Ampezzo of course, is that you can fill up on pasta until your heart’s content.

 

Luca Faloni Italian clothing Quality Knitwear

1930s ski poster, advertising the resort of Cortina d’Ampezzo

For a warming libation after a hard day on the slopes, head to the historic American Bar in the Hotel de la Poste. Formerly a post office for the village’s stagecoach mail, it was transformed into a bar in the early 20th century and in the interwar years, became a favourite haunt of the notoriously vinous writer, Ernest Hemingway. It’s antique pinewood interiors, expertly mixed concoctions and white-jacketed waiters ensure a 5-star alpine experience.

And Cortina isn’t just about skiing and après, either. The town itself has an array of designer shops to satisfy even the most ardent shopper. In fact, a lot of people don’t come here to ski at all – around 70% of visitors never even step onto the piste. For those with a bit more of an intrepid streak, there’s much more on offer than the usual black and blue runs. Snow Ice, offers ice-driving lessons, 3km away in Fiames, where the avid petrol head can experience the thrill of skidding about on fresh ice in a souped-up Mitsubishi (you are of course, trained how to do this, by a professional rally driver). The biggest bonus of staying in Cortina d’Ampezzo of course, is that you can fill up on pasta until your heart’s content.

Italy has always been associated with glamour and Cortina d’Ampezzo takes the crown as Italy’s most chic resort. Originally rising to prominence after hosting the 1956 winter Olympics, it’s renowned for superb racing trails and chocolate-box charm, which being a traditional Tyrolian village, it has in spades.

For a warming libation after a hard day on the slopes, head to the historic American Bar in the Hotel de la Poste. Formerly a post office for the village’s stagecoach mail, it was transformed into a bar in the early 20th century and in the interwar years, became a favourite haunt of the notoriously vinous writer, Ernest Hemingway. It’s antique pinewood interiors, expertly mixed concoctions and white-jacketed waiters ensure a 5-star alpine experience.

And Cortina isn’t just about skiing and après, either. The town itself has an array of designer shops to satisfy even the most ardent shopper. In fact, a lot of people don’t come here to ski at all – around 70% of visitors never even step onto the piste. For those with a bit more of an intrepid streak, there’s much more on offer than the usual black and blue runs. Snow Ice, offers ice-driving lessons, 3km away in Fiames, where the avid petrol head can experience the thrill of skidding about on fresh ice in a souped-up Mitsubishi (you are of course, trained how to do this, by a professional rally driver). The biggest bonus of staying in Cortina d’Ampezzo of course, is that you can fill up on pasta until your heart’s content.

 


Japan

The land of the rising sun is renowned for its cherry blossom, mastery with raw fish and rather potent rice wine, but it also has an amazing ski scene, too. There is a wide range of resorts dotted around the islands that form the Japanese archipelago, but Niseko situated on Hakkaido, is often considered the best.

One of the reasons for this accolade is due to its superb snow – it receives an average annual snowfall of 15m per year, which means you’re pretty much guaranteed excellent powder. As well as 44.5km of runs to explore, there are a myriad of alternative snow sports for the adrenaline junkie to indulge, including snow kiting. This is exactly as it sounds – you are strapped to a board and kite, which propels you along the snow at breakneck speed by harnessing the power of the wind. After you’ve spent all your energy on the slopes (and other extracurricular activities) you’ll want somewhere to unwind and recharge.

If all that pinewood and chintz of European alpine regions isn’t to your taste, the slick, minimalist interiors of luxury Japanese ski lodges should be more to your liking and the Zaborin Hotel will certainly hit the spot. Set in a tranquil forest in Hanazono, 15 minutes from town, the ‘ryokan’ – or guesthouse to the initiated – provides the full Japanese experience, with traditional house pyjamas and dinners consisting of locally foraged ingredients. Each villa in the ryokan features indoor and outdoor ‘onsen’ – essentially natural Jacuzzis, which are filled with pure, hot spring water tapped from almost a kilometre below ground. The water is incredibly rich in minerals and is reputed to have a range of health benefits – just what you need to restore your inner Zen after a hard day’s carving on the piste.

Japan

The land of the rising sun is renowned for its cherry blossom, mastery with raw fish and rather potent rice wine, but it also has an amazing ski scene, too. There is a wide range of resorts dotted around the islands that form the Japanese archipelago, but Niseko situated on Hakkaido, is often considered the best.

One of the reasons for this accolade is due to its superb snow – it receives an average annual snowfall of 15m per year, which means you’re pretty much guaranteed excellent powder. As well as 44.5km of runs to explore, there are a myriad of alternative snow sports for the adrenaline junkie to indulge, including snow kiting. This is exactly as it sounds – you are strapped to a board and kite, which propels you along the snow at breakneck speed by harnessing the power of the wind. After you’ve spent all your energy on the slopes (and other extracurricular activities) you’ll want somewhere to unwind and recharge.

If all that pinewood and chintz of European alpine regions isn’t to your taste, the slick, minimalist interiors of luxury Japanese ski lodges should be more to your liking and the Zaborin Hotel will certainly hit the spot. Set in a tranquil forest in Hanazono, 15 minutes from town, the ‘ryokan’ – or guesthouse to the initiated – provides the full Japanese experience, with traditional house pyjamas and dinners consisting of locally foraged ingredients. Each villa in the ryokan features indoor and outdoor ‘onsen’ – essentially natural Jacuzzis, which are filled with pure, hot spring water tapped from almost a kilometre below ground. The water is incredibly rich in minerals and is reputed to have a range of health benefits – just what you need to restore your inner Zen after a hard day’s carving on the piste.

 

Luca Faloni Italian clothing Quality Knitwear

1940s ski poster, advertising the Kanbayashi

The land of the rising sun is renowned for its cherry blossom, mastery with raw fish and rather potent rice wine, but it also has an amazing ski scene, too. There is a wide range of resorts dotted around the islands that form the Japanese archipelago, but Niseko situated on Hakkaido, is often considered the best.

One of the reasons for this accolade is due to its superb snow – it receives an average annual snowfall of 15m per year, which means you’re pretty much guaranteed excellent powder. As well as 44.5km of runs to explore, there are a myriad of alternative snow sports for the adrenaline junkie to indulge, including snow kiting. This is exactly as it sounds – you are strapped to a board and kite, which propels you along the snow at breakneck speed by harnessing the power of the wind. After you’ve spent all your energy on the slopes (and other extracurricular activities) you’ll want somewhere to unwind and recharge.

If all that pinewood and chintz of European alpine regions isn’t to your taste, the slick, minimalist interiors of luxury Japanese ski lodges should be more to your liking and the Zaborin Hotel will certainly hit the spot. Set in a tranquil forest in Hanazono, 15 minutes from town, the ‘ryokan’ – or guesthouse to the initiated – provides the full Japanese experience, with traditional house pyjamas and dinners consisting of locally foraged ingredients. Each villa in the ryokan features indoor and outdoor ‘onsen’ – essentially natural Jacuzzis, which are filled with pure, hot spring water tapped from almost a kilometre below ground. The water is incredibly rich in minerals and is reputed to have a range of health benefits – just what you need to restore your inner Zen after a hard day’s carving on the piste.

 

Luca Faloni Italian clothing Quality Knitwear

1940s ski poster, advertising the Kanbayashi


France

Megève has made a name as one of the most sophisticated resorts in the world, and it’s not hard to see why when you delve a little deeper into its pedigree. In 1914, the Baroness Noémie Rothschild of the famous banking dynasty decided she wanted to create a resort worthy of rivalling the über-chic St Moritz, in neighbouring Switzerland. She set about transforming the picturesque farming village into a louche, playground for the well-heeled and by the 1920s, it was the place for European aristocracy to be seen. And this blue-blood heritage is evident in the town’s atmosphere – whilst part of the draw is the winter sport, Megève is as much about indulgence and civility, with the village boasting some of the region’s best Michelin Star restaurants and five-star hotels.

One of the finest of which is Les Fermes de Marie– an establishment consisting of a hotel and a selection of the most decadent alpine chalets imaginable. These take rustic Savoyard interiors to quite another level, with exposed, seasoned pinewood architectural details, plush fabrics and shearling skins that result in a truly indulgent winter hideaway.

Whilst this isn’t a resort for extreme winter sports, it’s just the place if you like to take life at a more leisurely pace. Scenic hot-air ballooning is one of the more genteel activities on offer, which provides a birds-eye view of the stunning alpine landscape – do remember, you are on holiday after all.

Megève has made a name as one of the most sophisticated resorts in the world, and it’s not hard to see why when you delve a little deeper into its pedigree. In 1914, the Baroness Noémie Rothschild of the famous banking dynasty decided she wanted to create a resort worthy of rivalling the über-chic St Moritz, in neighbouring Switzerland. She set about transforming the picturesque farming village into a louche, playground for the well-heeled and by the 1920s, it was the place for European aristocracy to be seen. And this blue-blood heritage is evident in the town’s atmosphere – whilst part of the draw is the winter sport, Megève is as much about indulgence and civility, with the village boasting some of the region’s best Michelin Star restaurants and five-star hotels.

One of the finest of which is Les Fermes de Marie– an establishment consisting of a hotel and a selection of the most decadent alpine chalets imaginable.

These take rustic Savoyard interiors to quite another level, with exposed, seasoned pinewood architectural details, plush fabrics and shearling skins that result in a truly indulgent winter hideaway.

Whilst this isn’t a resort for extreme winter sports, it’s just the place if you like to take life at a more leisurely pace. Scenic hot-air ballooning is one of the more genteel activities on offer, which provides a birds-eye view of the stunning alpine landscape – do remember, you are on holiday after all.


Luca Faloni Italian clothing Quality Knitwear

Art Deco poster depicting the iconic cable car of Megève

France

Megève has made a name as one of the most sophisticated resorts in the world, and it’s not hard to see why when you delve a little deeper into its pedigree. In 1914, the Baroness Noémie Rothschild of the famous banking dynasty decided she wanted to create a resort worthy of rivalling the über-chic St Moritz, in neighbouring Switzerland. She set about transforming the picturesque farming village into a louche, playground for the well-heeled and by the 1920s, it was the place for European aristocracy to be seen. And this blue-blood heritage is evident in the town’s atmosphere – whilst part of the draw is the winter sport, Megève is as much about indulgence and civility, with the village boasting some of the region’s best Michelin Star restaurants and five-star hotels.

One of the finest of which is Les Fermes de Marie– an establishment consisting of a hotel and a selection of the most decadent alpine chalets imaginable. These take rustic Savoyard interiors to quite another level, with exposed, seasoned pinewood architectural details, plush fabrics and shearling skins that result in a truly indulgent winter hideaway.

Whilst this isn’t a resort for extreme winter sports, it’s just the place if you like to take life at a more leisurely pace. Scenic hot-air ballooning is one of the more genteel activities on offer, which provides a birds-eye view of the stunning alpine landscape – do remember, you are on holiday after all.

Morocco

Morocco

If we suggested skiing in a country that is composed of large swathes of desert, you might think we’ve lost the plot. But in Morocco, you can indeed find snow – and ski resorts for that matter. Oukaïmeden, Morocco’s largest ski destination, is located in the Atlas Mountains, 28 miles south of Marrakesh. But don’t go expecting immaculately groomed pistes – part of its charm is down to a wilder, more adventurous ski experience, much like in decades past.

Entrepreneurial guru and travel wunderkind Sir Richard Branson knows the allure of this high-altitude destination; Kasbah Termadot, in the Atlas village of Asni, was bought by Sir Branson in 1998. The 27-room house has since played host to a substantial list of luminaries, including Mick Jagger, Annie Lennox and Peter Gabriel. Key to the establishment’s ethos is a duty of care to the community, with 90% of staff employed from the local area.

In addition, the lodge offers free English lessons to the Berbers – the indigenous people of the region – and is committed to sustainable tourism. To keep guests amused, the property features rooms filled with antiques, nine Berber tent suites, an infinity pool, an outdoor cinema and most curiously, a menagerie of four mules, two camels and three donkeys, which guests are welcome to ride – although you’ll probably be too tired for any of this after a day on the slopes. Your standard Swiss chalet, this is not.

Luca Faloni Italian clothing Quality Knitwear

Air Atlas - Vintage poster

If we suggested skiing in a country that is composed of large swathes of desert, you might think we’ve lost the plot. But in Morocco, you can indeed find snow – and ski resorts for that matter. Oukaïmeden, Morocco’s largest ski destination, is located in the Atlas Mountains, 28 miles south of Marrakesh. But don’t go expecting immaculately groomed pistes – part of its charm is down to a wilder, more adventurous ski experience, much like in decades past.

Entrepreneurial guru and travel wunderkind Sir Richard Branson knows the allure of this high-altitude destination; Kasbah Termadot, in the Atlas village of Asni, was bought by Sir Branson in 1998. The 27-room house has since played host to a substantial list of luminaries, including Mick Jagger, Annie Lennox and Peter Gabriel. Key to the establishment’s ethos is a duty of care to the community, with 90% of staff employed from the local area.

In addition, the lodge offers free English lessons to the Berbers – the indigenous people of the region – and is committed to sustainable tourism. To keep guests amused, the property features rooms filled with antiques, nine Berber tent suites, an infinity pool, an outdoor cinema and most curiously, a menagerie of four mules, two camels and three donkeys, which guests are welcome to ride – although you’ll probably be too tired for any of this after a day on the slopes. Your standard Swiss chalet, this is not.

Luca Faloni Italian clothing Quality Knitwear

Air Atlas - Vintage poster


Italy

Italy has always been associated with glamour and Cortina d’Ampezzo takes the crown as Italy’s most chic resort. Originally rising to prominence after hosting the 1956 winter Olympics, it’s renowned for superb racing trails and chocolate-box charm, which being a traditional Tyrolian village, it has in spades.

Blue Oxford Shirt

Navy Cable Knit

France

Megève has made a name as one of the most sophisticated resorts in the world, and it’s not hard to see why when you delve a little deeper into its pedigree. In 1914, the Baroness Noémie Rothschild of the famous banking dynasty decided she wanted to create a resort worthy of rivalling the über-chic St Moritz, in neighbouring Switzerland. She set about transforming the picturesque farming village into a louche, playground for the well-heeled and by the 1920s, it was the place for European aristocracy to be seen. And this blue-blood heritage is evident in the town’s atmosphere – whilst part of the draw is the winter sport, Megève is as much about indulgence and civility, with the village boasting some of the region’s best Michelin Star restaurants and five-star hotels.

 

Cashmere Crew Neck

Blue Weekender